World Heritage Photos

Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps

The Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps are the remains of prehistoric settlements in the lakes and moors around the Alps. The UNESCO World Heritage Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps consists of 111 locations spread over six countries around the Alps: Austria, France, Italy, Slovenia, Switzerland and Germany. The prehistoric pile dwellings were built from around 5000 and 500 BC. The remains of the prehistoric wooden pile dwellings provide a lively insight into the lives of early agricultural societies and the development of ancient farming techniques in the Alpine region. Due to the rising water level most of the remains of the prehistoric pile dwellings are not visible, now they only can be found underwater. Several Pile Dwelling Museums houses collections of objects found by archaeologists during their research, the objects mainly include pottery and tools, the objects fell into the lakes during Prehistoric daily life or when the pile dwellings collapsed over the course of time. The Pfahlbaumuseum in Unteruhldingen in Germany with reconstructed pile dwellings gives a lively insight in the way prehistoric people lived. Some other locations of the prehistoric pile dwellings around the Alps: The Islet of Virginia in Italy and the Mondsee Lake in Austria. The pile dwellings are also called stilt houses or palafittes. The Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps gained status as an UNESCO World Heritage in 2011. World Heritage Art: Palafitte

www.werelderfgoedfotos.nl   © Copyright   World Heritage Photos

Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps - Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps: A reconstructed prehistoric pile dwelling village. The prehistoric pile dwelling village can be...

Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps: A reconstructed prehistoric pile dwelling village. The prehistoric pile dwelling village can be seen in the Pfahlbaumuseum in Unteruhldingen on Lake Constance (Bodensee). The museum provides a lively insight into the early agricultural societies in the Alpine region in the period 4000 BC to 850 BC. The UNESCO World Heritage Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps consists of 111 locations spread over six countries around the Alps. The prehistoric pile dwellings are the remains of prehistoric settlements in the lakes and moors around the Alps.

  1. Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps - Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps: A reconstructed prehistoric pile dwelling village. The prehistoric pile dwelling village can be...

    Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps: A reconstructed prehistoric pile dwelling village. The prehistoric pile dwelling village can be seen in the Pfahlbaumuseum in Unteruhldingen on Lake Constance (Bodensee). The museum provides a lively insight into the early agricultural societies in the Alpine region in the period 4000 BC to 850 BC. The UNESCO World Heritage Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps consists of 111 locations spread over six countries around the Alps. The prehistoric pile dwellings are the remains of prehistoric settlements in the lakes and moors around the Alps.

  2. Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps - Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps: The reconstructed Hornstaad House and the Arbon House in the background. The Hornstaad House was...

    Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps: The reconstructed Hornstaad House and the Arbon House in the background. The Hornstaad House was erected in accordance with the research results from Lake Constance. The Late Neolithic Arbon House is the result of a joint project by German and Swiss archaeologists. The pile dwellings have been in existence at the shores of all large lakes around the Alps. Prehistoric pile dwelling were discovered at lakes in Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Slovenia and Switzerland, but also were found at some lakes in Latvia, Lithuania and Spain.

  3. Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps - Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps: Reconstructed pile dwellings in the Neolithic Age Village in Unteruhldingen, Germany. The Neolithic...

    Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps: Reconstructed pile dwellings in the Neolithic Age Village in Unteruhldingen, Germany. The Neolithic Age Village was reconstructed according to the archaeological finds at the Federsee and the municipality Sipplingen at Lake Constance. The Pfahlbaumuseum (Lake Dwelling Museum) in Unteruhldingen is a spacious open-air museum with reconstructed pile dwellings from the period 4000 BC to 850 BC. The first pile dwellings were erected in 1922, based on archaeological excavations. The prehistoric pile dwellings are also called stilt houses or palafittes.

  4. Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps - Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps: This pile dwelling village was reconstructed according to artefacts found in Lake Constance....

    Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps: This pile dwelling village was reconstructed according to artefacts found in Lake Constance. During the Stone Age and Bronze Age, smaller and larger settlements existed on the shores of Lake Constance. The prehistoric villages could possibly have five or eighty houses. Due to the rising water level most of the remains of the prehistoric pile dwellings are not visible, now they only can be found underwater, but the reconstructed pile dwellings gives a lively insight in the way prehistoric people lived. This prehistoric pile dwelling village is situated in Unteruhldingen in Germany.

  5. Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps - Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps: A reconstructed prehistoric pile dwelling village in the Pfahlbaumuseum in Unteruhldingen in Germany....

    Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps: A reconstructed prehistoric pile dwelling village in the Pfahlbaumuseum in Unteruhldingen in Germany. The Neolithic Age, the New Stone Age, Village was reconstructed according to archaeological finds. This reconstructed Neolithic Age Village is surrounded by a reed palisade. The first houses were reconstructed in 1922. The houses were reconstructed with the same materials and techniques as used in the Stone Age, about 3500 BC. The Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps gained the status as an UNESCO World Heritage in 2011.