World Heritage Photos

Dutch part of the Wadden Sea

The Wadden Sea stretches from Den Helder in the Netherlands in the southwest to its northern bounderies north of Esbjerg in Denmark, crossing the estuaries of the rivers in the northwest part of Germany. Within the Netherlands the Wadden Sea is bounded from Lake IJsselmeer by the Afsluitdijk, a major causeway in the south. The Wadden Sea is the largest unbroken system of intertidal sands and mud flats in the world. Animals like seals live in the Wadden Sea and it is a popular breeding area and tanking station for migrating birds. The salt marshes of the Wadden Sea are covered with salt tolerant plants. The UNESCO World Heritage comprises the Wadden Sea Conservation Area in the Netherlands, the Lower Saxony Wadden Sea National Park and the Schleswig-Holstein Wadden Sea National Park in Germany and most of the Wadden Sea in Denmark. The Dutch part of the Wadden Sea and German part of the Wadden Sea was declared an UNESCO World Heritage in 2009. The Danish part of the Wadden Sea was added in 2014.

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Dutch part of the Wadden Sea - Wadden Sea: The lighthouse Lange Jaap (Long James) overlooking the Wadden Sea nearby Den Helder in the Netherlands. The lighthouse was built...

Wadden Sea: The lighthouse Lange Jaap (Long James) overlooking the Wadden Sea nearby Den Helder in the Netherlands. The lighthouse was built in 1877 and is made from cast iron. Lange Jaap is 63, 45 metres high, it is the tallest cast iron lighthouse in Europe and the second tallest  in the world. The Wadden Sea stretches from the city of Den Helder in the Netherlands, past the great river estuaries in Germany, to the city of Esbjerg in Denmark.

  1. Dutch part of the Wadden Sea - Wadden Sea: The lighthouse Lange Jaap (Long James) overlooking the Wadden Sea nearby Den Helder in the Netherlands. The lighthouse was built...

    Wadden Sea: The lighthouse Lange Jaap (Long James) overlooking the Wadden Sea nearby Den Helder in the Netherlands. The lighthouse was built in 1877 and is made from cast iron. Lange Jaap is 63, 45 metres high, it is the tallest cast iron lighthouse in Europe and the second tallest  in the world. The Wadden Sea stretches from the city of Den Helder in the Netherlands, past the great river estuaries in Germany, to the city of Esbjerg in Denmark.

  2. Dutch part of the Wadden Sea - Animals like seals live in the Wadden Sea and it is a popular breeding area and tanking station for migrating birds such as the common tern,...

    Animals like seals live in the Wadden Sea and it is a popular breeding area and tanking station for migrating birds such as the common tern, Eurasian spoonbill, pied avocet and the Kentish plover. The Wadden Sea is threatened by human activities such as gas drilling. Due to human activities, bird species are threatened to disappear from the Wadden Sea, such as the Arctic tern, avocet, common snipe, dunlin, eider, oystercatcher and the ruff.

  3. Dutch part of the Wadden Sea - Wadden Sea: The Noordpoldermude, the shallow navigation channel between the harbour of Noordpolderzijl and the Wadden Sea. The harbour of...

    Wadden Sea: The Noordpoldermude, the shallow navigation channel between the harbour of Noordpolderzijl and the Wadden Sea. The harbour of Noordpolderzijl is surrounded by coastal salt marshes. The salt marshes are covered with salt tolerant plants, such as sea lavender and samphire, a pioneer saltmarsh plant, the plant can survive on soils with high salt concentrations. The Wadden Sea was declared an UNESCO World Heritage in 2009.

  4. Dutch part of the Wadden Sea - The Wadden Sea is the largest intertidal zone in the world and the largest continuous national park in Europe. The Wadden Sea provides a...

    The Wadden Sea is the largest intertidal zone in the world and the largest continuous national park in Europe. The Wadden Sea provides a special and extreme environment for animals and plants. The sand flats, the wadden, are exposed at low tide, this gives birds an easy access to small animals and insects, such as snails, worms and mussels. The sands and dunes are also popular resting places for colonies of seals. 

  5. Dutch part of the Wadden Sea - Wadden Sea: The harbour of Noordpolderzijl is the smallest sea harbour in the Netherlands. The harbour is in direct tide-connection with the...

    Wadden Sea: The harbour of Noordpolderzijl is the smallest sea harbour in the Netherlands. The harbour is in direct tide-connection with the Wadden Sea. Only small ships can enter the harbour of Noordpolderzijl, because there is a limited navigable depth. Noordpolderzijl is not a village or city, there is only a cafe, a small harbour and a sluice gate (zijl) in the North Polder. Noordpolderzijl is also one of the starting points for guided mudflat tours.

  6. Dutch part of the Wadden Sea - Wadden Sea: The Ommelander Sea Dike and the old sluice gate at Noordpolderzijl. Along the Wadden Sea, the coast of Groningen, the...

    Wadden Sea: The Ommelander Sea Dike and the old sluice gate at Noordpolderzijl. Along the Wadden Sea, the coast of Groningen, the northeasternmost province of the Netherlands, is being protected by the Ommelander Sea Dike. On the sea-side of the dike there are the salt marshes and mud flats of the Wadden Sea. The dike stretches 70 km along the coast of the Wadden Sea, from Lauwersoog to Delfzijl.

  7. Dutch part of the Wadden Sea - Wadden Sea: Mudflat hikers across the Wadden Sea, the mudflats are still bare, the sand flats are covered by sea grasses, the grass...

    Wadden Sea: Mudflat hikers across the Wadden Sea, the mudflats are still bare, the sand flats are covered by sea grasses, the grass spread their roots deep into the tidal flats and is very suitable for creating new land. The Wadden Sea is very treacherous, mudflat hiking without a licensed guide is very dangerous. In the Netherlands, mudflat hiking without a licensed guide is prohibited. The Wadden Sea became an UNESCO World Heritage in 2009.

  8. Dutch part of the Wadden Sea - Wadden Sea: The dike between the Wadden Sea and lake Lauwersmeer, the dike was built in 1969 and is 13 km long, it has several sluices and a...

    Wadden Sea: The dike between the Wadden Sea and lake Lauwersmeer, the dike was built in 1969 and is 13 km long, it has several sluices and a canal lock. The dike was built to protect the surrounding areas of the inland Lauwers Sea. The sea became lake Lauwersmeer, a lake  with wetlands, reed marshes and polders. Lauwersmeer is a wintering area for geese, including large amounts of barnacle geese. The dike and lake are noted for birdwatching.

  9. Dutch part of the Wadden Sea - A small fishing boat in the Wadden Sea close to Schiermonnikoog, one of the Dutch Wadden Islands. The Wadden Islands are a chain of...

    A small fishing boat in the Wadden Sea close to Schiermonnikoog, one of the Dutch Wadden Islands. The Wadden Islands are a chain of islands along the edge of the Wadden Sea, stretching from the Netherlands to Denmark, they separate the North Sea from the Wadden Sea. There are about fifty Wadden Islands in the Wadden Sea, most of the islands are uninhabited. The Netherlands has five inhabited and three uninhabited Wadden Islands.